National identity and global culture

Michele Marsonet
Abstract:
It is often said today that the agreement on the possibility of greater mutual understanding among human beings has failed. Would have led to the resurgence of long-suppressed hatreds, hatreds that have their source in the differences linked to national identities, ethnic and religious. We would be short before the end of universalistic concepts that have permeated the last centuries. In addition, the skepticism resulting from the growing success of postmodern ideas on the philosophical and political. In fact, if we look at history, the decline of universalistic concepts is not specific to our age. The reassertion of national identities, ethnic and religious is a recurrent phenomenon, which occurs every time some supranational empire, more or less tyrannical, collapses. Neither seems safe to regard the resurgence of identity as a sign of abandonment of cosmopolitanism. Such events have happened in cyclic rhythm in the past and should not cause us to be pessimistic about a renewed success in the future of ideals that point to unite rather than divide, to enhance the factors that unite us as human beings rather than to emphasize the elements that separate us from each other. The loss of confidence in the sophistication, the current decline of universalist ideas are not phenomena whose origin can be traced to intellectual circles. They reflect, rather, the widespread perception that the future can not be better The problem, in short, is not to fight the global society, but to create a just global society. The term “globalization” in recent years has been loaded with negative meanings, has become a sort of fetish which gathers into one the world’s ills. All this is symptomatic of much confusion. You do not ever stress enough the positive aspects of globalization properly understood. Globalization means not necessarily homogenizing force. Globalize not necessarily equivalent to eliminate differences and identities. On the contrary. It may mean, however, give rise to a global society where respect for differences and identity becomes a matter of course. It is often said today that the agreement on the possibility of greater mutual understanding among human beings has failed. Would have led to the resurgence of long-suppressed hatreds, hatreds that have their source in the differences linked to national identities, ethnic and religious. We would be short before the end of universalistic concepts that have permeated the last centuries. In addition, the skepticism resulting from the growing success of postmodern ideas on the philosophical and political.

Full text available in PDF: Academicus-MMX-1-044-048.pdf

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.medra.org/10.7336/academicus.2010.01.03

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